Thursday, 03 December 2015 17:55

ONYAT'A:KA Oneida Pride!

 

Oneida Pride

 

Oneida Pride – Students Celebrate Their Creativity & Culture

I just had an incredible week full of Oneida Pride as I worked with students at Standing Stone School at Oneida Nation of the Thames. Four classes were interested in songwriting, one wanted to do filmmaking and another did slam poetry. On Friday afternoon I commandeered the school PA system and started playing this song we’d written together over the intercom. The students all poured out of their classrooms and we had this impromptu rock show moment in the hallway!

When I walked into the Grade 2 classroom I asked what type of song they’d like to write. “A Christmas song!” one little girl exclaimed. I asked what we should call it. “Christmas Town” another chimed in. By the time I could grab a marker and make my way to the white board the kids were off and running, calling out lyrics as I scrambled to write them down.

I grabbed my guitar and started to find a melody that would work with the lyrics, as well as be in a good key for them to be able to sing. In four days we wrote the music, lyrics and melody together and recorded it. And honestly…it’s an amazing song!

CHRISTMAS TOWN

At the beginning of the week, I had an opportunity to get together with L:ao Antone, the Oneida language teacher, who graciously helped me work out some Oneida words that could be incorporated into the song I was writing with the kids. Creative and cultural literacy projects are an incredible opportunity to work together collaboratively to create something bigger than anyone person who is involved. This video is where we started on Monday…by Friday we were chanting at the top of our lungs in the hallway like we were at a rock concert!

SONGWRITING IN ONEIDA

If you’re interested in booking creative or cultural literacy projects for your school contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 250-896-2572

Published in Tour Stories
Tuesday, 06 October 2015 18:38

Change The World

Change Your Words You Can Change The World

An Artist Residency is one of my favourite things in the world. It gives me the opportunity to spend quality time in a school investing in the lives of the students and staff. This week I got to work with 360 students to produce a multi media production called, Change The World/Change le Monde.

Words like ‘madhouse’ ‘bedlam’ and ‘creative chaos’ were used on several occasions and some of the more ‘senior staff’ were captured on video covering their ears in a desperate attempt to muffle the deafening cheers. (Though smiles tugged suspiciously at the corners of their mouths at the same time)

The Plan…produce a digital media project that celebrated the community life of the school, highlighting themes like social responsibility and leadership and really set the tone for the school year. When I arrived Monday morning, I was given a schedule that looked like a piece of homework that maybe the dog actually should have eaten. Teacher’s names were scribbled and scrawled…some were crossed out and redirected with curved double-ended arrows indicating a reshuffling of exotic ingredients in some madcap creative recipe. I kid…it showed me immediately that the staff were engaged and accommodating to making this plan work for everyone. Cooperation is key to success!

Day One…I spent the first day dashing from room to room, interviewing all the students. What words did they use to describe their school, their class, teacher and friends? I asked them for personal stories of how someone had made their life better, and how they had made someone else’s life better and wrote it all down.

I compiled word banks and created a cache of stories from these interviews. A big colourful sign in the hallway that said, ‘Change Your Words, Change Your Mindset’ really caught my eye. (and imagination) At the end of Day One I sat down and channeled all the inspiration to write a song called, Change the World.

Day Two…bright and early I was once again scampering through the hallways, drifting in and out of classrooms like a wandering minstrel, teaching the new song to each class. In between rehearsals we worked out visual components of our project. Central is a French Immersion school, so language is a big part of their identity. ARTS posters are pinned on every wall spelling out the school’s community values. Acceptance/Accepter, Respect/Respecter, Together/Tous, Security/Sécurité.

Plans emerged for each classroom make giant, colourful posters that spelled out these words. It was a tactile way for the kids to engage with the words that express the values that create a safe, encouraging environment that foster their hopes and dreams.

 

We covered a huge area in one hallway with paper, creating a ‘School Wall’ where students could write personal iMessages like, ‘I feel safe here’ ‘I respect my friends.’ In the brilliant words of one little dude, ‘this is the most awesomeist graffiti ever!’

I explored the wild side of the playground with my camera, capturing the kid’s energy and enthusiasm in their natural habitat. When you’re in elementary school, the playground is where the real work of respect, acceptance and togetherness is done.

I also found time to marvel that at some point in my life I too had been able to swing on monkey bars without pulling my limbs from their sockets.                        (those days are long past)

Day Three…flew by in a blur of filming, drawing, colouring and rehearsing as I raced from the highest room in the tallest tower to the deep dark recesses of Central’s WWII era basement. I’m not going to lie, 360 kids keep you hopping. One of things I love about being a facilitator is the energy builds exponentially because everyone is able to be involved in a way that plays to their strengths. I’m not the horse or the wagon…I’m just the wild guy with the guitar having the time of his life playing a melody that lets us sing together at ear-bleeding levels.

Day Four…the momentum continued to build through the day, coming to a deafening ‘world changing’ crescendo at the assembly in the gym, where the mood was electric and the kids sang so loud it felt like an AC/DC concert.

I set up my portable recording gear, set a stationary camera at the back of the room and gave my handheld to a volunteer and we proceeded to record and film the song three different times. Watching the footage close to a gazillion times as I edited the video, I was blown away by the power of community and creativity to change our lives and the world around us.

I love being part of a great story and happily offer my 18 years of experience as a professional writer, performer and producer in the music, TV and film industry to each school to help students discover their talents, gifts and abilities so they can tell their story in ways they haven’t before. If this is something that would interest your school or community, you are 100% free (and encouraged) to contact me anytime!  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

It is a privilege to be able to invest in the lives of others.
Merci Beaucoup…Change le Monde!

 

Published in Tour Stories
Tuesday, 06 October 2015 18:34

Change The World

Change Your Words You Can Change The World

An Artist Residency is one of my favourite things in the world. It gives me the opportunity to spend quality time in a school investing in the lives of the students and staff. This week I got to work with 360 students to produce a multi media production called, Change The World/Change le Monde.

Words like ‘madhouse’ ‘bedlam’ and ‘creative chaos’ were used on several occasions and some of the more ‘senior staff’ were captured on video covering their ears in a desperate attempt to muffle the deafening cheers. (Though smiles tugged suspiciously at the corners of their mouths at the same time)

The Plan…produce a digital media project that celebrated the community life of the school, highlighting themes like social responsibility and leadership and really set the tone for the school year. When I arrived Monday morning, I was given a schedule that looked like a piece of homework that maybe the dog actually should have eaten. Teacher’s names were scribbled and scrawled…some were crossed out and redirected with curved double-ended arrows indicating a reshuffling of exotic ingredients in some madcap creative recipe. I kid…it showed me immediately that the staff were engaged and accommodating to making this plan work for everyone. Cooperation is key to success!

Day One…I spent the first day dashing from room to room, interviewing all the students. What words did they use to describe their school, their class, teacher and friends? I asked them for personal stories of how someone had made their life better, and how they had made someone else’s life better and wrote it all down.

I compiled word banks and created a cache of stories from these interviews. A big colourful sign in the hallway that said, ‘Change Your Words, Change Your Mindset’ really caught my eye. (and imagination) At the end of Day One I sat down and channeled all the inspiration to write a song called, Change the World.

Day Two…bright and early I was once again scampering through the hallways, drifting in and out of classrooms like a wandering minstrel, teaching the new song to each class. In between rehearsals we worked out visual components of our project. Central is a French Immersion school, so language is a big part of their identity. ARTS posters are pinned on every wall spelling out the school’s community values. Acceptance/Accepter, Respect/Respecter, Together/Tous, Security/Sécurité.

Plans emerged for each classroom make giant, colourful posters that spelled out these words. It was a tactile way for the kids to engage with the words that express the values that create a safe, encouraging environment that foster their hopes and dreams.

 

We covered a huge area in one hallway with paper, creating a ‘School Wall’ where students could write personal iMessages like, ‘I feel safe here’ ‘I respect my friends.’ In the brilliant words of one little dude, ‘this is the most awesomeist graffiti ever!’

I explored the wild side of the playground with my camera, capturing the kid’s energy and enthusiasm in their natural habitat. When you’re in elementary school, the playground is where the real work of respect, acceptance and togetherness is done.

I also found time to marvel that at some point in my life I too had been able to swing on monkey bars without pulling my limbs from their sockets.                        (those days are long past)

Day Three…flew by in a blur of filming, drawing, colouring and rehearsing as I raced from the highest room in the tallest tower to the deep dark recesses of Central’s WWII era basement. I’m not going to lie, 360 kids keep you hopping. One of things I love about being a facilitator is the energy builds exponentially because everyone is able to be involved in a way that plays to their strengths. I’m not the horse or the wagon…I’m just the wild guy with the guitar having the time of his life playing a melody that lets us sing together at ear-bleeding levels.

Day Four…the momentum continued to build through the day, coming to a deafening ‘world changing’ crescendo at the assembly in the gym, where the mood was electric and the kids sang so loud it felt like an AC/DC concert.

I set up my portable recording gear, set a stationary camera at the back of the room and gave my handheld to a volunteer and we proceeded to record and film the song three different times. Watching the footage close to a gazillion times as I edited the video, I was blown away by the power of community and creativity to change our lives and the world around us.

I love being part of a great story and happily offer my 18 years of experience as a professional writer, performer and producer in the music, TV and film industry to each school to help students discover their talents, gifts and abilities so they can tell their story in ways they haven’t before. If this is something that would interest your school or community, you are 100% free (and encouraged) to contact me anytime!  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

It is a privilege to be able to invest in the lives of others.
Merci Beaucoup…Change le Monde!

Published in Homepage
Wednesday, 04 September 2013 16:08

Empowering Youth

 

For 15 years Tribe of One has been working with teachers, administrators and countless organizations to empower and inspire students in communities across North America. Our multi cultural performance workshops allow students to see and hear how First Nations, Metis, French/English and South American indigenous cultures compliment and inspire each other. It's one thing to talk about multi culturalism...it's another to see it in action!

Tribe of One features musicians, dancers, painters and slam poets, providing schools and communities with the highest levels of professional arts and culture instruction and opportunities. Immediately following our presentation students get to choose from a variety of break out sessions where they have the opportunity for hands on instruction in, hoop dancing and capoeira, painting, slam poetry, multi media storytelling, photography, filmmaking, songwriting and textile arts.

If you work in schools, community development, youth programming or know someone who does, please pass our information on to them and encourage them to contact us. Tribe of One is a national artist collective and represents the combined passion, energy and excitement of Canada's leading cultural innovators.

Contact:

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it - 250 896 2572

 

Published in Tour Stories
Thursday, 16 May 2013 16:47

UNESCO

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESC0) is one of 18 specialized agencies within the United Nations System. It was established on November 16, 1945, as much of the world was emerging from the devastation of the Second World War.

UNESCO was formed to embody a culture of peace by promoting collaboration among nations through education, the sciences, culture, and communication and information. With an incredible 68 year history, it's sometimes surprising how many people have never heard of the organization and don't really know what they do.

As a national artist collective who fuse the rich heritage of indigenous cultures through modern forms of artistic expression to educate, empower audiences while they are entertained, Tribe of One is perfectly suited to appreciate the value of UNESCOs goals and objectives. It is those shared values that makes our partnership so dynamic.

"Humanity's most valuable assets have been the non-conformists. Were it not for the nonconformists, he who refuses to be satisfied to go along with the continuance of things as they are, and insists upon attempting to find new ways of bettering things, the world would have known little progress indeed." Josiah Gitt.

In today's globalized new world culture, recognizing the value of our diversity and differences, and finding creative and innovative ways to build our future together has never been more important. This was Tribe of One's initial point of connection with UNESCO and one we are very proud to celebrate in this video.

 

By Rik Leaf - Recording Artist, TV Host/Producer, Slam Poet & Published Author, Rik is the founder of Tribe of One, a national artist collective that fuses the rich heritage of indigenous cultures with modern forms of artistic expression. Featuring First Nations, Metis, French, English and Brazilian musicians, dancers, painters and poets.

Published in Tour Stories
Thursday, 15 November 2012 05:33

A Journey of Discovery

The Journey of Discovery is an opportunity for Aboriginal and non Aboriginal students to come together in an exciting, creative environment that encourages risk taking and mutual respect. The facilitators enjoy working with community services to tailor the material to target key issues and existing programs.

A Journey of Discovery
is presented by a collective of indigenous artists from across Canada who lead students through a series of creative and cultural workshops. Combining traditional songs, stories, dance and regalia with modern forms of artistic expression students explore our shared past and the common ground we can build on as we face the future together.

Students can experience,

  • singing around a pow wow drum
  • beading and regalia making
  • learning traditional dances
  • discovering the meaning behind the traditions, stories and songs the excitement of taking creative risks
  • exploring forms of artistic expression and cultural heritage (slam poetry and song writing)
  • working collectively to produce a short film

The Journey of Discovery explores self-confidence, courage, healthy choices, creativity, community and risk taking and can be presented as a one day cultural performance workshop series, ideally suited as a multi cultural component for conferences, seminars and assemblies. We also offer the series of workshops and presentations over several days leading up to a mini pow wow, where the visual art created decorates the space, dancers wear the regalia they made as they perform with drummers and singers. This can be an incredible investment into the creativity of a community.

About the Facilitators:

Rob Spade is an Anishinabe artist-educator from Fort Hope First Nation. Rob brings years of experience delivering cultural education, counseling and support, cultural sensitivity training, cultural-arts-based therapy and guidance to Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children, youth, and adults. He is a gifted and accomplished storyteller, dancer, drummer, singer, and visual artist influenced by the Ojibwe Woodlands Style.

Celeste Pedri is a proud Anishinabe-qwe from Lac Des Mille Lacs First Nation. Celeste is currently an active member of the indigenous academic community as she is completing her PhD of Philosophy (Anthropology) at the University of Victoria. She is an accomplished Ojibwe artist (beadwork, regalia, drummer) and is currently the artist-in-residence at the University of Victoria’s Centre for Religion and Spirituality in Society.

Rik Leaf is from the Red River Valley region of southern Manitoba. He is a professional recording artist, TV producer, author and the founder of the Canadian performance collective, Tribe of One, featuring French, English, First Nations and Métis musicians, dancers, painters and poets. Rik has drafted pilot projects for the Foreign Affairs Department, traveled to war-torn countries with the United Nations and provided cultural educational programming to over 20 First Nations communities from coast to coast across Canada.

Published in Tour Stories
Monday, 18 April 2011 16:32

Tribe of One - Culture & Art Workshop

Tribe of One is a group of world-class performers who fuse the rich heritage of Indigenous cultures with modern forms of artistic expression. Featuring First Nations, Metis, French & English musicians, dancers, painters and slam poets. Tribe of One provides painting, dance, music and drumming workshops throughout morning and early afternoon with a multi disciplinary performance at the end of the day.

In addition, Tribe of One also produces a DVD that incorporates the artistic contributions of the students and is presented to the school at the end of the day. The Tribe’s presentation teaches the value of risk taking and the importance of discovering how your unique gifts and abilities not only empower you to invest in your future, but also provide meaningful opportunities for collaboration with others who have different skill sets, backgrounds, beliefs, lifestyles and cultures.

Tribe of One provide all production requirements, sound system and lighting, sound technicians, instruments and equipment..

For additional information, please visit

http://tribeofone.com or email

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call

250-483-4177.

Word on the street:

“In their workshops and in concert, Tribe of One went far beyond entertaining our students (though they did that too.) Their highimpact visit gave a real boost to the fi ne and performing arts in our school, and I shudder to think that we might have missed an amazing opportunity had I been too quick to hit the delete button.”

· Geoff Bueger, Principal, Princess Alexandra School, Hay River, NWT, 2010

 

Published in Tour Stories

Satisfied Customers

banner